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Posts tagged ‘Turkey’

Turkey: Foreign players rule

So our friends at the Turkish Football Federation (TFF) has brought in the new foreign player rule. The new laws stipulate that any Club can only have a maximum of eight ‘foreign’ players on the pitch at any given time and no more than fourteen in the squad.

We checked with some of our esteemed contacts and former clients and the instant feedback was:

“It is scandalous that the decision was taken on the night of match which was played badly and said goodbye to the Euro2020.”

KILAVUZ GÖRSEL ÇÖZÜMLERİ VE REKLAMCILIK SAN. TİC. A.Ş.

 “This is going back to old rule which local players worth more then their ability. At the moment there are players who started their career in Turkey and play in teams like Leicester, Juventus, Liverpool, Lille, Frankfurt because they have to develop themselves to ger better contract, but if it is obligatory to start with locals, you either pay more than worth or play with lower class players. We will see what will happen in future.”

KOC SISTEM BILGI VE ILETISIM HIZMETLERI

“The number of foreign football players is a long term problem in Turkey. There is a high population of young people living in Turkey and many young football players play football in the lower leagues and amateur leagues. There aren’t many football players who are foreign immigrants and Turkish citizens in Turkey. The laws do not allow this. Turkey is not a country of immigrants. Turkey is not multi-cultural like England, France, Germany or Spain. There are not many football players who are Turkish citizens of African origin. In addition, if the number of foreign football players is high, it reflects negatively on the formation of the National Team and prevents young Turkish football players playing in the lower leagues and amateur leagues and progressing to professional football players in the upper leagues. Also, if the number of foreign players is high, it negatively affects the competition between the 4 big clubs (Fenerbahce, Galatasaray, Fenerbahce, Trabzonspor) with the clubs in Anatolia in terms of budgets and transfers. Since Anatolian clubs and lower leagues have insufficient budgets and cannot transfer good foreign players, they cannot compete with the upper leagues with the big 4 clubs. But, if the number of foreign players is low, it reduces the competitiveness of Turkish teams in the Champions League and European Leagues. The Turkish Football Federation sometimes reduces or increases the number of foreign players in order to maintain these balances. My opinion is that Turkish Teams can compete in Europe with no-limit to the number of foreign players in the Super League and lower professional leagues. “

FIRAT UNIVERSITY

🙈

BACHESEHIR UNIVERSITY

Through, UEFA, the TFF has commented:

“Our primary target is to transform Turkish football, into a better structure that educates and develops elite football players and make Turkey a leading power in Europe and the world.”

It needs to do something after the shambolic showing in Euro 2020!

In a statement, the TFF released the spending limits for the 20 clubs competing in the Super Lig. Not one size fits all however, and the limits, can be exceeded for some up to by twenty five percent. For example, Galatasaray will be able to spend the most, with a TL 546 million ($63 million) limit. This takes the full excess allowance into account.

Other restrictions include regulations to prohibit foreign players signing if in excess of 32 years’ old. Guess that rules me out then! Much of this is catalysed by the crazy transfer fees and remuneration packages trying to woo international elite to Turkey. The trend has been under investigation with penalties shown to leading clubs and bans from European competitions. 

Clearly the above is aimed at the Turkish trying to get their own house in order and make a solid future where more opportunities for the indigenous population to thrive.

the S’PORT vlog 2 – Timur Direkler #football [July 2020]

S’PORT vlog with an interview of Turkish ‘Sporting Director’.  We educated him in the true meaning of his name.  In turn, he shared the transition from officiating in the Super Lig to returning to grassroots refereeing in Greater Manchester, United Kingdom.  The highs and lows of being an intermediary were explored and finally the latest quest to acquiring, building and launching his own football club, close to his home Town of Izmir. Of enjoyment to anyone interested in football and sports in general – and interviewed by Host, Adrian Stores of www.acrobatfcsm.com who couldn’t resist the occasional bit of banter in the native tongue. 

Broken Countries: Stay or Go #Britain #Turkey

As I awake this Easter Holiday and reflect on Sky News and the day’s and previous day’s events, I am tempted to recite those famous lyrics of The Clash band ‘Should I stay or should I go now?’.  Not afraid of being controversial, I put forward a viewpoint that might suggest some undertones and causes of unacceptable behaviour by sporting fans, that may have roots in the turmoil in the indigenous countries.  On this occasion, I’m advocating a view  of ‘Broken Britain’ and ‘Broken Turkey’.

Well respected sports journalists this week recalled events in Spain surrounding Leicester City’s supporters invasion of Madrid in the Champions League.  David Conn reported: “Leicester fans in a square in Madrid chanting ‘You Spanish bastards. Gibraltar is ours”. Oliver Holt: “Last night – Dortmund fans sharing their homes with Monaco fans shouting ‘Gibraltar is ours’. Makes you despair”. The Gibraltar subject being one of a newsworthy matter of potential #Brexit conflict in negotiations now that article 50 has been evoked.

It’s not that freedom of speech should be curtailed vis-a-vis Turkey’s President Recep Tayip Erdogan. However, with the ‘Foxes” incident, I advocate this mirrors a growing trend among English fans to aggression, racism, hooliganism and isolation. Leicester merely mimics a Country-wide trend, witnessed personally by me following the English national Team.

I still recite the demographics and metrics of the stereotypical ‘Brexiteers’ as a contract to the ‘Remainers’.  Of course, one should be wary of tarring all with that same brush, but it has been exposed that poverty, disillusionment and ignorance were common traits of that, slightly more than half of the Country, that voted for us to leave Europe.  I feel the same disadvantaged populous are those that are found among these hooligans.  I also suggest that this is not just a few, but the way an increasing portion of the British population are moving. The future can only mean more turmoil if such idiotic beliefs and unacceptable behaviour are likely to grow.  It this a ‘time bomb’ waiting to explode?  Is this the Country that we want future generations to be brought up in?

Last night, the fans of Besiktas rioted in France. The current documentaries by Simon Reeve on Turkey offers an unbiased reporting of the characteristics and frailty in both economic, cultural and political terms.  Here there is a clear hypothesis that by the ruling party allowing more immigration and offering relatively small ‘handouts’ to the poorer segment of society then what is happening is tantamount to ‘buying votes’ to further the aims and securing the power of that same AK Parti. The referendum is upon us which could give the biggest boost to that political party and widen the gap between Islamists and the traditional supporters of modern Turkey for which Ataturk was catalyst.

Okay – maybe a tenuous link, but I would promote one theory that hooliganism in football with Turkish fan involvement, may also have roots in the unrest from their homeland (By the way, I have also seen French supporters that are not blameless and witnessing firsthand where such as socio-disadvantage, ethnicity and social-exclusion may have inflamed situations).

In a short blog post, one should be wary of generalisations. Yest, I feel there could be factors much wider than traditional football supporting motivations that are now driving behaviour.  Where, I live bus loads of Turks, many of which I know, have travelled to London for advance voting to try and prevent increased influence to Erdogan. In this same area, the majority voted Remain in the EU Referendum.  So whilst some comfort in being surrounded by like-minded people, I do worry about the future in both of these two great countries and for the first time actually contemplate ‘Go’ in search of the best future for my family.

Adrian Stores is CEO at ACROBAT | FCSM.  It concentrates on marketing, sponsorship and fundraising – mainly in UK and Turkey. More information: http://www.acrobatfcsm.com

Game of Two Halves

The Day started that way and was remembered in the same vein.  My Students, and no doubt other traditionalists, ribbed me that it was at this England versus Turkey match, that I eventually succumbed to a ‘half and half’ scarf.  I make no apologies, it just seemed right to buy for my Son – with his 50:50 heritage from these two great countries.

I use this same analogy to reflect on the ‘Good’ and ‘Bad’, the two halves from this Weekend’s excursion.

Firstly, the Good. How good is it to not have to make that blasted long trip to the ‘Smoke’ just to watch my team, domestic or National?  I know this in particular from an infectious stream of losses by County although the last trip resulted in Play Off Promotion.  I really applaud the England idea of traveling the Country to give all supporters a fair chance. Long may it continue!

Personally, despite one hiccup at the  X-Gate, I found the stewarding to be superb and a credit to Mancunians once again.  This comment spreads the whole route from the Metro in the City’s Centre to Manchester City FC’s seats.  The atmosphere was great, both sets of supporters a credit, caught up with old friends (Brits and Turks!) and we won.  England that is!

The Bad, daft drunken fans who I confronted because of continuous swearing in front of children. Also, others making inappropriate comments about Turks, who again I put in place as I’m proudly married into that Country. And for my first time being an opinionated pundit, the last bad was Raheem Sterling.  Is that loss of confidence or just a waste of time being included in the Squad?

I returned home also to learn of abuse from a Twitter profile saying he witnessed an ISIS flag in the Turkish end.  Another mistaken identity and the Twitterosphere shot that same person ‘down in flames’!

Really looking forward to the next trip to watch ENG-ER-LAND with the Lad.  Euro 2016 here we come!