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Reign in Spain 2

The ‘game’ of financial roulette as reported before in this blog needed urgent action in Spain.  The Spanish Football League has now announced new rules designed to prevent clubs from overspending.

These regulations include powers to limit the total cost of any clubs’ playing squad – also players registration can be prevented if perceived to be above an acceptable budget – though I don’t yet understand how this is calculated.  The Turkish connection portrayed, namely: Deportivo La Coruna is the latest Club to seek assistance to avoiding going bump and has filed for bankruptcy protection. 

This move appears another step in the right direction after the earlier agreed protocol to comply with UEFA’s financial fair play (FFP) regulations in the Country. Notably. from 2014 clubs must set up a ‘fund’ totalling 35% of their revenue from media rights to act as a guarantee against any tax liabilities.  I’m sure our HMRC would favour such. Furthermore, there is now an obligation for clubs to provide detailed budgets for the following season(s) including information on sales and expenditure, profit and loss and investments or any sales of assets.

Will I need to write about Reign in Spain 3?

Reign in Spain

Over in continental Europe, Spain’s Government has taken a significant step to outlaw a previous, controversial law which allowed clubs that were strapped for cash to avoid relegation by going into administration.  I’m sure Barry Hearn wouldn’t have liked this law much! 

Racing Santander was the last club to seek protection from creditors under the former law, in the summer.  Others that have taken this unfair advantage have included big brands such as two of the ‘Reals’: Mallorca and Zaragoza (a member of my family is on the management team there).   I can’t help but smile here, thinking of the Turks use of ‘Real’ in an attempt to avoid passing-off and copyright (aka ‘Real’ Koç).  Players and the indigenous Trade Union have applauded this move, said to be a key reason for the stand-off and strike pre-season at La Liga.  The dispute between Spanish footballers and the Professional League has just been rectified with players finally agreeing to call off strike action.   The players apparently account for a liability of some 50 Million Euros from clubs using the Law to not fulfil financial obligations, amongst other reasons.  “This reform will prevent the undesirable use and abuse of certain instruments of the bankruptcy law and ensure stability and equality in sports competitions” – the Government has commented, according to Reuters News Agency.

 Twenty-one clubs in Spain were either in administration, recently exited or in the process of applying. So it’s officially an epidemic?  A tightening up of laws can only help create that ‘level playing field’!

Rugby Dreams Are Made

It reads like a story not real life, but this Weekend’s Events show the stuff that dreams are made off. 16 year old, Kaya Stores from Cheadle Hulme High School and playing his rugby for Manchester and Cheshire was instrumental in the historic performance of the Turkish Team in the Rugby Europe Tournament in Latvia. Despite being the youngest in this u18s Team, he progressed through two 10 day camps and physical assessments to be selected in the final 12 to travel. He then featured in every match.

The fact the first three teams all came from the same Group Stage shows how tough it was to progress. In Group stages, Turkey overwhelmed Austria, were narrowly defeated by Luxembourg and lost to Switzerland. But they did enough to secure a Quarter Final place on Day 2.

They started as they meant to go on by defeating Hungary with its 6 foot 4 Captain. They then reversed the score from the previous Day and easily had victory over an ambitious Luxembourg side. They then improved also against Switzerland, but they were just two strong again.

The result means that as a Finalist, Turkey now qualifies to join the Championship next year for the first time in its history. It will now face the might of such as: France, Ireland, Romania and Spain.

Two of the Turkish Team will still be eligible, Kaya and Serkan Ates. Of the performances by Kaya, the Turkish Rugby Federation said that “Turkey was proud of him” as did the new Turkish Consulate in Manchester. He qualifies for the Country through his Turkish Mother, Bilge, yet his Father Stockport-businessman, Adrian Stores accompanied the Team throughout helping with translations, analysis, filming and coaching.

His Teammates at Manchester Rugby Club were ever so supportive sending regular messages. What an experience. Kaya now dreams of playing more for Turkiye and may be a contender for Captain one day.

Turkey: Foreign players rule

So our friends at the Turkish Football Federation (TFF) has brought in the new foreign player rule. The new laws stipulate that any Club can only have a maximum of eight ‘foreign’ players on the pitch at any given time and no more than fourteen in the squad.

We checked with some of our esteemed contacts and former clients and the instant feedback was:

“It is scandalous that the decision was taken on the night of match which was played badly and said goodbye to the Euro2020.”

KILAVUZ GÖRSEL ÇÖZÜMLERİ VE REKLAMCILIK SAN. TİC. A.Ş.

 “This is going back to old rule which local players worth more then their ability. At the moment there are players who started their career in Turkey and play in teams like Leicester, Juventus, Liverpool, Lille, Frankfurt because they have to develop themselves to ger better contract, but if it is obligatory to start with locals, you either pay more than worth or play with lower class players. We will see what will happen in future.”

KOC SISTEM BILGI VE ILETISIM HIZMETLERI

“The number of foreign football players is a long term problem in Turkey. There is a high population of young people living in Turkey and many young football players play football in the lower leagues and amateur leagues. There aren’t many football players who are foreign immigrants and Turkish citizens in Turkey. The laws do not allow this. Turkey is not a country of immigrants. Turkey is not multi-cultural like England, France, Germany or Spain. There are not many football players who are Turkish citizens of African origin. In addition, if the number of foreign football players is high, it reflects negatively on the formation of the National Team and prevents young Turkish football players playing in the lower leagues and amateur leagues and progressing to professional football players in the upper leagues. Also, if the number of foreign players is high, it negatively affects the competition between the 4 big clubs (Fenerbahce, Galatasaray, Fenerbahce, Trabzonspor) with the clubs in Anatolia in terms of budgets and transfers. Since Anatolian clubs and lower leagues have insufficient budgets and cannot transfer good foreign players, they cannot compete with the upper leagues with the big 4 clubs. But, if the number of foreign players is low, it reduces the competitiveness of Turkish teams in the Champions League and European Leagues. The Turkish Football Federation sometimes reduces or increases the number of foreign players in order to maintain these balances. My opinion is that Turkish Teams can compete in Europe with no-limit to the number of foreign players in the Super League and lower professional leagues. “

FIRAT UNIVERSITY

🙈

BACHESEHIR UNIVERSITY

Through, UEFA, the TFF has commented:

“Our primary target is to transform Turkish football, into a better structure that educates and develops elite football players and make Turkey a leading power in Europe and the world.”

It needs to do something after the shambolic showing in Euro 2020!

In a statement, the TFF released the spending limits for the 20 clubs competing in the Super Lig. Not one size fits all however, and the limits, can be exceeded for some up to by twenty five percent. For example, Galatasaray will be able to spend the most, with a TL 546 million ($63 million) limit. This takes the full excess allowance into account.

Other restrictions include regulations to prohibit foreign players signing if in excess of 32 years’ old. Guess that rules me out then! Much of this is catalysed by the crazy transfer fees and remuneration packages trying to woo international elite to Turkey. The trend has been under investigation with penalties shown to leading clubs and bans from European competitions. 

Clearly the above is aimed at the Turkish trying to get their own house in order and make a solid future where more opportunities for the indigenous population to thrive.