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Reign in Spain 2

The ‘game’ of financial roulette as reported before in this blog needed urgent action in Spain.  The Spanish Football League has now announced new rules designed to prevent clubs from overspending.

These regulations include powers to limit the total cost of any clubs’ playing squad – also players registration can be prevented if perceived to be above an acceptable budget – though I don’t yet understand how this is calculated.  The Turkish connection portrayed, namely: Deportivo La Coruna is the latest Club to seek assistance to avoiding going bump and has filed for bankruptcy protection. 

This move appears another step in the right direction after the earlier agreed protocol to comply with UEFA’s financial fair play (FFP) regulations in the Country. Notably. from 2014 clubs must set up a ‘fund’ totalling 35% of their revenue from media rights to act as a guarantee against any tax liabilities.  I’m sure our HMRC would favour such. Furthermore, there is now an obligation for clubs to provide detailed budgets for the following season(s) including information on sales and expenditure, profit and loss and investments or any sales of assets.

Will I need to write about Reign in Spain 3?

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Reign in Spain

Over in continental Europe, Spain’s Government has taken a significant step to outlaw a previous, controversial law which allowed clubs that were strapped for cash to avoid relegation by going into administration.  I’m sure Barry Hearn wouldn’t have liked this law much! 

Racing Santander was the last club to seek protection from creditors under the former law, in the summer.  Others that have taken this unfair advantage have included big brands such as two of the ‘Reals’: Mallorca and Zaragoza (a member of my family is on the management team there).   I can’t help but smile here, thinking of the Turks use of ‘Real’ in an attempt to avoid passing-off and copyright (aka ‘Real’ Koç).  Players and the indigenous Trade Union have applauded this move, said to be a key reason for the stand-off and strike pre-season at La Liga.  The dispute between Spanish footballers and the Professional League has just been rectified with players finally agreeing to call off strike action.   The players apparently account for a liability of some 50 Million Euros from clubs using the Law to not fulfil financial obligations, amongst other reasons.  “This reform will prevent the undesirable use and abuse of certain instruments of the bankruptcy law and ensure stability and equality in sports competitions” – the Government has commented, according to Reuters News Agency.

 Twenty-one clubs in Spain were either in administration, recently exited or in the process of applying. So it’s officially an epidemic?  A tightening up of laws can only help create that ‘level playing field’!

Spotlight

For a change, I thought I’d share a profile of one of the sponsors that has supported a sporting organisation, which ACROBAT FCSM represents.  Riqueza has been this Season’s main shirt sponsor at Manchester Rugby Club.

“Riqueza Group believes in building lifelong relationships for wealth, health and happiness. So what does that mean? Let’s use Sport as a Sector for an example as to how Riqueza do their business!

As a member of The London Sporting Club in Mayfair, Riqueza has built a number of relationships with sports personalities past, present and future. Pictured are partners of Riqueza Neil Rustage and Carl Oates with their land, property client, Sam Allardyce. Sam has land and property in Moraira, Spain where Riqueza has an Office. The guys from Riqueza also have pride in their Brand Ambassador, Roy Evans (ex-Liverpool).

Riqueza sponsors and supports a number of non league sporting entities across the UK including Manchester Rugby Club and AFC Fylde of the Vanarama National League. One of the services it offers is to facilitate personal and professional insurances for the clubs across players, directors and supporters.

Riqueza enjoys some great relationships on a personal level across sport encompassing the media, the athletes themselves, agents and organisations. Riqueza’s partner Carl Oates was recently in a prominent photograph with Sky Sports News Presenter, Hayley McQueen, at The League Managers Awards dinner, one of footballs’ most prestigious annual events. Riqueza works closely with Van Rooyen in Warrington, Cheshire to provide high net worth sporting clients with luxury, prestige and elite cars from across the World on a leased and purchased basis.

So just a few anecdotes on what wealth, health and happiness means in collaboration.  In summary, if you’re in the market for luxury property, luxury cars or all encompassing personal and professional insurances to protect yourself, Riqueza would love to help. They can be contacted on: hello@riqueza.co or visit their website www.riqueza.co “

Broken Countries: Stay or Go #Britain #Turkey

As I awake this Easter Holiday and reflect on Sky News and the day’s and previous day’s events, I am tempted to recite those famous lyrics of The Clash band ‘Should I stay or should I go now?’.  Not afraid of being controversial, I put forward a viewpoint that might suggest some undertones and causes of unacceptable behaviour by sporting fans, that may have roots in the turmoil in the indigenous countries.  On this occasion, I’m advocating a view  of ‘Broken Britain’ and ‘Broken Turkey’.

Well respected sports journalists this week recalled events in Spain surrounding Leicester City’s supporters invasion of Madrid in the Champions League.  David Conn reported: “Leicester fans in a square in Madrid chanting ‘You Spanish bastards. Gibraltar is ours”. Oliver Holt: “Last night – Dortmund fans sharing their homes with Monaco fans shouting ‘Gibraltar is ours’. Makes you despair”. The Gibraltar subject being one of a newsworthy matter of potential #Brexit conflict in negotiations now that article 50 has been evoked.

It’s not that freedom of speech should be curtailed vis-a-vis Turkey’s President Recep Tayip Erdogan. However, with the ‘Foxes” incident, I advocate this mirrors a growing trend among English fans to aggression, racism, hooliganism and isolation. Leicester merely mimics a Country-wide trend, witnessed personally by me following the English national Team.

I still recite the demographics and metrics of the stereotypical ‘Brexiteers’ as a contract to the ‘Remainers’.  Of course, one should be wary of tarring all with that same brush, but it has been exposed that poverty, disillusionment and ignorance were common traits of that, slightly more than half of the Country, that voted for us to leave Europe.  I feel the same disadvantaged populous are those that are found among these hooligans.  I also suggest that this is not just a few, but the way an increasing portion of the British population are moving. The future can only mean more turmoil if such idiotic beliefs and unacceptable behaviour are likely to grow.  It this a ‘time bomb’ waiting to explode?  Is this the Country that we want future generations to be brought up in?

Last night, the fans of Besiktas rioted in France. The current documentaries by Simon Reeve on Turkey offers an unbiased reporting of the characteristics and frailty in both economic, cultural and political terms.  Here there is a clear hypothesis that by the ruling party allowing more immigration and offering relatively small ‘handouts’ to the poorer segment of society then what is happening is tantamount to ‘buying votes’ to further the aims and securing the power of that same AK Parti. The referendum is upon us which could give the biggest boost to that political party and widen the gap between Islamists and the traditional supporters of modern Turkey for which Ataturk was catalyst.

Okay – maybe a tenuous link, but I would promote one theory that hooliganism in football with Turkish fan involvement, may also have roots in the unrest from their homeland (By the way, I have also seen French supporters that are not blameless and witnessing firsthand where such as socio-disadvantage, ethnicity and social-exclusion may have inflamed situations).

In a short blog post, one should be wary of generalisations. Yest, I feel there could be factors much wider than traditional football supporting motivations that are now driving behaviour.  Where, I live bus loads of Turks, many of which I know, have travelled to London for advance voting to try and prevent increased influence to Erdogan. In this same area, the majority voted Remain in the EU Referendum.  So whilst some comfort in being surrounded by like-minded people, I do worry about the future in both of these two great countries and for the first time actually contemplate ‘Go’ in search of the best future for my family.

Adrian Stores is CEO at ACROBAT | FCSM.  It concentrates on marketing, sponsorship and fundraising – mainly in UK and Turkey. More information: http://www.acrobatfcsm.com